Feature Stories

Editorial: Honoring National Estuaries Week

Editorial: Honoring National Estuaries Week

By: Rachel Rouillard, PREP & Cory Riley, GBNERR Appeared in Foster’s Daily Democrat 10/4/2013 This week, people all around the country celebrated National Estuaries Week. Great Bay and Hampton-Seabrook are New Hampshire’s estuaries – economically and ecologically valuable places where fresh water and salt water come together. Since you live in the seacoast region, you may have celebrated National Estuaries Week without even knowing it. If you ate an oyster or had fish for dinner

Read more

Research Spotlight: Macro Algae – What is it? Why’s it important? Where is it?

Research Spotlight: Macro Algae - What is it? Why's it important? Where is it?

Understanding the dynamics of an estuary is not easy but it’s infinitely fascinating. There’s constant shifts in the salinity of the water, the clarity of the water and  the presence or absence of certain species, particularly algae. Algae comes in many forms; there are tiny, microscopic algae that float in the water, also called phytoplankton, and there are large, rooted and un-rooted seaweeds called macroalgae. The reason scientists want to study algae is that algae

Read more

Celebrate the 25th Annual National Estuaries Day – Toast the Coast

Celebrate the 25th Annual National Estuaries Day - Toast the Coast

This Saturday we celebrate the 25th Annual National Estuaries Day. The purpose of National Estuaries Day, first observed in 1988, is to promote the importance of coastal environments where rivers meet the sea. Nationwide, approximately 110 million people, or more than half of all Americans, live near an estuary and enjoy the many benefits estuaries provide. More than 25% of New Hampshire’s population call the Great Bay and Hampton-Seabrook Estuaries home, more than 375,000 people. Great Bay

Read more

Neighbors Unite to Restore Local Pond in Exeter

Neighbors Unite to Restore Local Pond in Exeter

Margaret Mead once wrote: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.“ Combine those committed citizens with progressive town leaders, university researchers and community planners and you’ve got a recipe for success. Brickyard Pond, a 1.8 acre pond along Kingston Road in Exeter, has long been a community icon. In the not so recent past, there were walking trails around the

Read more

Moose Mountains Regional Greenways Gets a Big Win for Land Protection

Another effective method for preventing pollution into headwater streams is to conserve and protect the land surrounding the waterways. In Wakefield, NH there’s a new 122-acre Wildlife Management Area. It was through the collaborative work of NH Fish & Game, Moose Mountains Regional Greenways (MMRG), the Town of Wakefield Conservation Commission and the Society for the Protection of NH Forests that this land protection project was brought to fruition. NH Fish & Game acquired the property to protect its outstanding wildlife

Read more

Acton Wakefield Watersheds Alliance – Engaging Students in Pollution Control

The headwaters of the Great Bay estuary form in Wakefield, NH and Acton, Maine. A series of lakes and ponds converge to form the Salmon Falls River which flows south, meets with the Cocheco River to form the mighty Piscataqua River and that flows south into Little Bay, Great Bay and/or out into the Atlantic. Not only does water flow south through the watershed but so does pollution, soils that have eroded and nutrients. Actions

Read more

Get Out in the Field with the Coastal Research Volunteers

With the arrival of warmer weather is also the arrival of the field research season for our research partners and scientists and this year there is exciting opportunities for citizens to join in the work. A new program has been launched in the coastal watershed and is looking for active volunteers! The Coastal Research Volunteers (CRV) organized by NH Sea Grant and UNH Cooperative Extension’s Alyson Eberhardt is kicking off its 2013 field season with

Read more

Southeast Watershed Alliance's Stormwater Standards

It’s widely understood that in areas with faster rates of development the spread of the impervious surface is increased. Impervious surfaces are areas that don’t let water infiltrate into the ground like parking lots and roofs. Because water can’t infiltrate it runs off and it picks up all the dirt, litter, oils and pollutants with it and this results in elevated levels of pollution into our waterways – this is stormwater pollution. Not only is

Read more

New Castle’s Fertilizer Education Efforts

New Castle's Fertilizer Education Efforts

The Town of New Castle has recently adopted a wonderful public education program called Lawns to Lobsters which is aimed at reducing pollution from fertilizers and pesticides running off of neighborhood lawns. The program is part of a larger effort by the New Castle Conservation Commission to curb water pollution into the Great Bay Estuary from the island community. Being an island community and sitting at the mouth of the estuary, the town of New

Read more

The Smallest Streams Can Hold Big Surprises

The Smallest Streams Can Hold Big Surprises: Removing the Shorey’s Brook Dam Located on the town line between Eliot, and South Berwick, Maine, Shorey’s Brook is only about 4 miles long. As early as the 1630’s it has been dammed a few hundred feet upland from where it empties at the confluence of the Cocheco and Salmon Falls rivers (where they become the Piscataqua River). After the failing dam was removed in December of 2011,

Read more
Page 12 of 12« First...89101112

PREP is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program, a joint program between local, state and federal agencies established under the Clean Water Act with the goal of protecting and enhancing nationally significant estuarine resources. PREP is supported in part by an EPA matching grant and is housed within the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering at the University of New Hampshire.

Menu