Resources for Towns


Stormwater Runoff

The topic of stormwater runoff and management is a big one in many of the communities around the PREP region.  Over half of the PREP region communities in New Hampshire are regulated by US EPA’s municipal separate storm sewer system (MS4) permits. Below are a variety of tools, trainings and resources that PREP and our partners in the Natural Resource Outreach Coalition (NROC) have developed to help communities meet the new requirements of the ms4 Phase II permits.  NROC delivers customized education and assistance to community boards, staff and residents. There is no charge for most NROC programs.

To find out more about NROC Stormwater assistance, please contact:   Amanda Stone, Extension Specialist Land & Water Conservation (603)862-1067 or email

US EPA’s Non-Point Source Outreach Toolbox

This comprehensive web portal is intended for use by town, state and local agencies and other organizations interested in educating their citizens on non-point source pollution or stormwater runoff. The Toolbox contains a variety of resources to help develop an effective and targeted outreach campaign.

→ US EPA’s NPS Outreach Toolbox, (visit site)

Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater: A Bird’s Eye View

Provides information about on-the-ground actions for communities to improve stormwater management from landscape to site level scales.  Facilitated discussion helps communities develop a focus to fit their needs.
Format:  presentation and facilitated discussion
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff
Audience Benefits: offers the what (content), why (motivation), and how (process and strategies).
→ Protecting Water Resources and Managing Stormwater, (Download PDF)

The Watershed Game

Developed by NEMO (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials) Northland in Minnesota, The Watershed Game simulates the costs and benefits of implementing various Best Management Practices (BMPs) in order to reach a pollution reduction goal as well as the shared effort required to do so. This interactive exercise encourages group participation and helps people discuss ways to address water quality issues such as excess phosphorous and nitrogen.
Format:  interactive exercise led by NROC team members
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff
Audience Benefits: offers the how and why
→ Northland NEMO (Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials), www.northlandnemo.org

Forging The Link:  Linking the Economic Benefits of Low Impact Development and Community Decision making

This presentation illustrates the advantages of Low Impact Development (LID) with respect to ecological benefits for protection of water resources; economic benefits for stormwater management; and LID as a climate adaptation planning tool.  Facilitated discussion engages participants and helps them consider and prioritize strategies to meet their goals.
Format:  presentation and facilitated discussion, fact sheets, a detailed guide and website
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff; professional buildings, developers, engineers, designers.
Audience Benefits: offers the what and how much (cost)
→ Forging the Link (FTL), www.unh.edu

Coastal Training Program Series – Great Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve

Workshops are offered for the topics: Stormwater, Nitrogen issues, Non-point source pollution, and Ecosystem functions.
Format:  presentation and facilitated discussion
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff
Audience Benefits: Varies depending on session
→ Coastal Training Program, www.greatbay.org

Southeast Watershed Alliance’s Stormwater Standards for Coastal Communities

Developed by the Southeast Watershed Alliance and the UNH Stormwater Center these standards provide a consistent level of stormwater management and water quality protection and were designed to be adopted by all 42 NH coastal communities.
Format:  presentation and facilitated discussion
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff
Audience Benefits: offers the what and how
→ Southeast Watershed Alliance, www.southeastwatershedalliance.org

Green Infrastructure for Coastal Communities

This project supports the implementation of green infrastructure projects both on-the-ground types and non-structural elements e.g. stormwater systems to treat runoff (rain gardens, vegetated swales, gravel wetlands); regulations requiring better infrastructure performance; and incentives or education to encourage property owners to protect water quality.
Format:  on-the-ground implementation of projects, municipal ordinance changes & outreach messaging
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff, community residents
Audience Benefits: offers the what, how, why, how much
→ Green Infrastructure, www.southeastwatershedalliance.org

Getting In Step: A Guide to Watershed Outreach Campaign Planning

Developed by the US EPA to help aid communities in conducting watershed outreach campaigns, this includes tips and tools for creating awareness about non-point source pollution, educating specific audiences and motivating positive behavior change to improve water quality.
Format:  presentation and facilitated discussion
Intended Audience:  community boards, municipal staff and watershed organizations
Audience Benefits: offers the what, how, why, how much
→ Getting in Step, A Guide for Conducting Watershed Outreach Programs, (Download PDF)

UNH Stormwater Center Workshops

Workshops are offered for the topics: BMPs, Porous Pavement, Subsurface Gravel Wetland & Bioretention System Design
Format:  Presentation, Site visits, In field presentation, printed materials and workshop
Intended Audience:  community boards and municipal staff
Audience Benefits: Varies depending on session

PREP is part of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program, a joint program between local, state and federal agencies established under the Clean Water Act with the goal of protecting and enhancing nationally significant estuarine resources. PREP is supported in part by an EPA matching grant and is housed within the School of Marine Science and Ocean Engineering at the University of New Hampshire.

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